The Airheads Beemer Club is a non-profit club reclaiming the 'Legendary Motorcycles of Germany'

Topic-icon '83 R100RT: Updated Alternator Noise

More
3 weeks 3 days ago - 3 weeks 2 days ago #5777 by 10665
I installed an EME 400w alternator (no brush, magnetic) and ignition system on my R100RT. All works well, charges at 13.5 to 14v, ignition fires smoothly. Problem: I am getting a lot of noise from the front of the engine that sounds like metal rubbing on metal. I have measured the distance between the rotor and stator and have a good gap all the way around, have removed and reinstalled everything, but can't find any signs of metal on metal rubbing or scraping, yet the noise is still there. Any suggestions? Thanks.

Pete
Lillian, AL
'83 R100RT 60th Ann.
'10 Ural w/hack
Last edit: 3 weeks 2 days ago by Wobbly.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
3 weeks 2 days ago - 3 weeks 2 days ago #5778 by Wobbly
Replied by Wobbly on topic '83 R100RT: Updated Alternator Noise
You didn't mention the mileage, but it's probably about time to replace your cam chain. Open the front cover again, remove the alternator again, then remove the inner engine cover. This is fairly simple and straight forward work, all performed with tool kit tools.

• One of the keys to reducing engine noise is to check the chain-to-sprocket fit. When the chain stretches it no longer fits the large sprocket correctly all the way around, thus generating noise.

• Another is to replace the tensioner blade AND (most importantly) install the updated tensioner plunger SPRING.

Note there are 2 chain blades and only the tensioner side of the equation (the RH blade) will need replacement if wear is proceeding normally. If you work slowly and methodically, you can, using very simple shop aids (like the cable ties in the photo) keep the plunger compressed AND pull the two chain ends together to install the master link. About 2 hours start to finish.




Also note that different batteries require different charge rates. In days gone by there were only flooded cell batteries. Now there are 3 or 4 diffent constructions and each has it's own individual charge rate. You may require an adjustable voltage regulator to get the most from your battery.

Hope this helps.

Don't hide 'em, Ride 'em !!
#15150
Last edit: 3 weeks 2 days ago by Wobbly.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
3 weeks 2 days ago #5779 by 10665
Replied by 10665 on topic '83 R100RT: Updated Alternator Noise
Thanks for the fast response. The mileage is around 28,500, but considering the bike sat for a long time, nothing surprises me. Your suggestion seems to be spot on and parallels my assumptions. I especially appreciate the photos showing how to retain the tensioner. I also considered the bearing being bad, so will check that out when I get it apart. It's going to be awhile before I can get to work (medical issues requiring surgery) but I'll keep you posted as to the outcome when I get to work on it. Again, thanks a million for your help.
Pete

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
3 weeks 2 days ago - 3 weeks 2 days ago #5780 by Wobbly
Replied by Wobbly on topic '83 R100RT: Updated Alternator Noise
Pete -
Good thinking. Ball bearings can indeed collect condensate during long storage if the temp isn't controlled. Then they develop small rust pits in the bearing race, which can generate very loud noises, far out of proportion to the damaged area. Usually this type damage shows up ~200-500 miles after the bike is put back on the road. Once the cover is off, that's a cheap item to replace.



• For better battery charging while the inner cover is off....
1) Get rid of the original 4 rubber rectifier mounts. The inner cover should be converted to use solid metal rectifier standoffs. motoelekt.com/charging.htm
2) Both the alternator and the rectifier are electrically connected to the inner cover. But due to the paper gaskets, the inner cover can become electrically isolated from everything else. Best to run a copper wire from the inner cover to the starter mounting bolt or similar on the main part of the engine.

• On engines over 20 years old, never miss an opportunity to replace o-rings and oil seals when covers are removed for other service. The inner front cover has several.

• Keep us posted about YOUR condition... and then that of the bike.

All the best, my friend.

Don't hide 'em, Ride 'em !!
#15150
Last edit: 3 weeks 2 days ago by Wobbly.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Moderators: 8166Wobbly
Time to create page: 1.384 seconds